It’s fair to say I introduced myself to Oculus Quest with a healthy dose of skepticism. Facebook’s new standalone headset is hardly the first to try and broaden VR’s appeal; Gear VR, Lenovo’s Mirage Solo and Oculus Go each set out with that same mission. But did any of these really change the conversation around VR? The complaints about accessibility, price, content and performance? Not really. Even with the promise of inside-out tracking, I wasn’t convinced Quest would necessarily change the game any more than these headsets have. Now that I’ve owned one for just under a month, though, I’m much more assured that it will. VR Without The Hassle Quest removes so much of the burden of VR that it’s genuinely become a part of my daily schedule. I’m not talking about hesitantly hooking up Rift wires and trudging through yet another Guardian recalibration. I’m also not fighting my PSVR camera to find the specific spot in my living room that provides the best tracking. I just grab the kit, stand in the center of my room and dive into VR. I know how often that’s been promised, but this time it really is a revelation. But it didn’t happen overnight. I’ll admit to first feeling a little underwhelmed by Quest’s closeness to Rift games and the familiarity I felt with much of it. The change instead came methodically; less of a lightbulb moment and more of a gradual brightening. Over the past four weeks, I’ve started to find myself more enthusiastic about jumping into VR. Not because I don’t already love it; at this point I’m practically enamored with the platform. Instead, it’s the strides the console makes in immediacy. For the past few nights I’ve not been able to resist diving back into Star Wars: Vader Immortal‘s addictive wave-based combat mode when I’m meant to be pushing on with other reviews. Even if it’s just for a few minutes, getting a quick hit of lightsaber-swinging action without any of the added hassle feels like the clearest manifestation of VR’s promise of instant wish fulfillment. Changing The Conversation More importantly, though, Quest has eradicated that awkward moment. You know that one I mean, when a jaw-dropped first timer removes a Vive or a Rift from their eyes and giddily asks: “How much?!” “Uh, well you have to buy a PC that costs about $1,000,” you say. “And then the headset is about $400.” “Oh,” they reply. Granted $399 is still a little on the dear side, but it’s a much easier pill to swallow now. It’s no longer a conversation killer, it’s a starting point from which you can show people why they should buy into VR. That’s going to play an important part in any VR conversation going forward. So yes, on a very literal level, Quest is going to change the conversation. Challenges Ahead Oculus’ next challenge will be to keep the momentum up. Quest’s launch line-up is fantastic and will buy it a few weeks of happy gamers, but we’ll need a steady supply of great new [...] The post One Month On, Oculus Quest Has Changed How I Perceive VR For The Better appeared first on UploadVR.

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Today’s the big day! Oculus Quest, Facebook’s long-anticipated standalone VR headset, is finally available. Fast-fingered pre-orderers should be getting units arriving on their doorsteps throughout the day. It’s like Christmas, only with annoying family time replacemed with glorious isolation. There is, quite frankly, a lot to talk about today, some of which you might have already missed. So we’re bringing all of our Quest launch coverage under one roof to make sure you get the most out of your headset. We’ll be adding to this list as our coverage continues so make sure to check back often. Oculus Quest Hardware Reviews Still on the fence about picking up a Quest? Our extensive review has all you’ll ever need to know about the headset. We’ve had an exhaustive amount of time with Quest now, tracking battery life, performance and, well, the tracking itself. Our final verdict is right here. Also, while you’re at it, why not check out our review for the new Touch controllers that come bundled with Quest? Oh and there’s a travel case that’s worth checking out too. Essential Lists Everyone loves a good list, and we’ve already got plenty of them for Quest. From the best games to buy to titles that support cross-buy and beyond, take a look at our comprehensive round-ups. Every Oculus Store Game/App With Cross-Buy The 10 Best Oculus Quest Games To Buy At Launch Install Sizes For Every Quest Launch Game How To’s Need a little help getting up to speed with Quest? We’ve got a bunch of helpful how to articles to suit your needs. How To Stream Oculus Quest To Twitch, YouTube, Facebook, And More Livestreams Why read about VR when you could watch it? Check out our archived livestreams (and ones to come!) to see the standalone headset in action. Oculus Quest Launch Day Giveaway Livestream Oculus Quest Game Library Preview Livestream: Launch Day Lineup Oculus Quest Launch Library Livestream: Vader, Beat Saber, VRChat, Rec Room, And More Rec Room And VRChat Oculus Quest Livestream – Standalone Social VR Oculus Quest Livestream: Wireless Roomscale VR Games Oculus Quest Game Reviews Of course, Quest isn’t just about hardware; there’s also a slate of VR experiences to dive into. Around 50 titles arrive today, some brand new, some ports of Rift games. We’ve got impressions of a good chunk of them below. Superhot VR Dance Central VR Virtual Virtual Reality Star Wars: Vader Immortal Episode 1 I Expect You To Die Apex Construct Creed: Rise to Glory Beyond Launch There is, of course, much more to come for Quest. Doctor Who: The Edge Of Time Fujii Other Headlines Don’t go yet! Just a few last bits of housekeeping before we let you loose in VR. Watch Apex Construct Played In A Field New Oculus Touch Replacements Now On Sale Facebook Looking Into Multi-Account Support No Cross-Buy For Superhot, Moss And Beat Saber Tagged with: Hardware, Oculus Quest, VR games .special-buttons > * { text-align:left !important; } FacebookTwitterRedditMore The post All Of Our Oculus Quest Launch Coverage In One Place appeared first on UploadVR.

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Phantom: Covert Ops is the next Oculus Studios title coming to Rift and Quest and it's a stealth action game developed by nDreams. The post Phantom: Covert Ops Looks Like Metal Gear Solid For Oculus Quest And Rift appeared first on UploadVR.

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Joel Breton has been known as the head of HTC’s Vive Studios content division, but is leaving the company to join Sixense as the President of the newly founded Sixense Studios and Executive Vice President of product and development. In this role at Sixense’s new software division, Breton will oversee content creation and will deal directly with Sixense’s client base. Sixense has a checkered past as a consumer company, especially following a major fiasco with production and delivery of its Kickstarter-funded 6DOF VR controllers that ended in full refunds to all backers. Since then, they’ve reportedly pivoted to more enterprise-level clients. “Our software team has developed a deep understanding of the core principles of human interactions with immersive environments over the past decade,” said CEO of Sixense Enterprises, Amir Rubin. “With Joel’s deep experience with content development, and with bringing both consumer and enterprise cross-platform applications to market, he will be invaluable to our growth.” Sixense has been known as a hardware company, so this is an interesting shift and certainly a major addition to the team. Breton’s background at Vive encompasses all of the studio’s Ready Player One content, Knockout League, Skyworld Kingdom Brawl, Arcade Saga, and more. Prior to that Breton worked at Sega, GT Interactive, MTV Networks, and more. Details are scarce on what exactly Breton can contribute directly and immediately, but projects like SiegeVR from IGT show promise, as do clients such as VRSim and Lincoln Electric. Let us know what you think of this shake up in the VR landscape down in the comments below! Tagged with: sixense, vive studios .special-buttons > * { text-align:left !important; } FacebookTwitterRedditMore The post Former Head Of HTC Vive Studios Joel Breton Joins Sixense appeared first on UploadVR.

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It looks like Oculus Quest isn’t the only headset getting one of VR’s best experiences this week. Tender Claws’ fantastic Virtual Virtual Reality is launching on PSVR too. The developer confirmed as much to us after we spotted the title on the PlayStation Blog, which listed it in its roundup of new releases. It releases today for $19.99. Virtual Virtual Reality is a narrative-driven VR experience. In it, you join a futuristic mega-corporation that allows clients to virtually fulfill their dreams, however weird they may be. You start out by working for the company, but it doesn’t take long to uncover a more sinister undertaking behind the scenes. The game’s sharp script and inventive use of VR are quite brilliant. It’s a funny week to bring the game to PSVR. V-VR is, of course, also launching alongside the Oculus Quest as well. It started life on Google Daydream and Oculus Go but also came to PC VR headsets like Rift and Vive. The Quest version, then, provides the freedom of the mobile version with the tracking of the PC version. We haven’t tried it on PSVR, but we’d imagine Quest will be the best place to play it. If you’re not getting Oculus’ standalone on launch, though, we’d definitely suggest getting V-VR elsewhere. In our (very late) review last week, we labeled the experience as an Essential app. “Virtual Virtual Reality remains an early VR gem,” we wrote. “Whether its message of the possible pitfalls of the VR generation ahead is to be heeded seriously is part of its appeal. Is this simply a wacky exaggeration of where we’re headed, or is there something deeper hidden in the depths of Activitude? It’s up to you to decide, but you’ll have a lot of fun doing so.” Tagged with: Virtual Virtual Reality .special-buttons > * { text-align:left !important; } FacebookTwitterRedditMore The post The Excellent Virtual Virtual Reality Launches On PSVR This Week appeared first on UploadVR.

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Oculus Quest is a standalone VR headset with room-scale positional tracking and Oculus Touch controllers. Quest is primarily intended for people who don’t already own a gaming PC. But if you do own a PC and a Rift already, you might be wondering if you’ll have to purchase games, experiences, and apps you already own for Rift. Or if Quest is your first Oculus headset, you might want to know whether you’d need to re-purchase games if you decide to get a Rift S to enter PC VR in the future. The answer is that the Oculus Store system supports cross-buy, but it’s up to each developer. Here are all the titles we know of with confirmed cross-buy: Angry Birds VR Resolution Games Angry Birds VR brings the famous mobile game franchise into room scale virtual reality. The spatial nature of VR really really does add to the gameplay. Apex Construct Fast Travel Games Apex Construct [8/10 on Rift] is a single-player story-driven action adventure game featuring bow and arrow combat. It’s set in a post-apocalyptic future where robots have taken over, and lasts around five hours. Apollo 11 Immersive VR Education Apollo 11 takes you on the entire historic journey from the Saturn V launch at Kennedy Space Center to the Eagle landing on the Sea of Tranquility. This is the story of when mankind first set foot on another world. Bonfire Baobab Studios Bonfire is a VR short film from the makers of Invasion!, Asteroids!, and Crow: The Legend. It stars Ali Wong. The story is that you’ve crash landed on a planet while trying to find a new home for humans. BoxVR FitXR BoxVR is a rhythm based boxing game specifically designed for working out. Creed: Rise To Glory Survios Creed: Rise To Glory puts you in the shoes of Adonis Creed and has you fighting a gallery of foes back-to-back that get increasingly more difficult as time goes on. Dance Central VR Harmonix Dance Central was one of the most popular Xbox 360 Kinect titles, and now the series is coming to VR. It features 32 songs including hits like What is Love, Turn Down for What, and Don’t Let Me Down. Dead and Buried 2 Oculus Studios The original Dead and Buried [8.5/10 on Rift] was unlike most VR shooters in that it didn’t use thumbstick movement. Instead, it was a cover-based experience where the challenge is in breaking cover enough to kill enemies but not so much you get shot. It also had a cooperative zombie horde mode. Ths sequel features the original modes, but now also includes a full smooth locomotion deathmatch mode that’s reminiscent of Quake. Drop Dead: Dual Strike Pixel Toys Dual Strike is a total overhaul of the co-op zombie shooter Rift game Drop Dead [7.5/10]. It adds dual wieling as well as a range of melee weapons such as scythes, axes, and pitchforks. It has multiple co-op environments as well as a campaign. Eleven: Table Tennis VR Fun Labs Eleven delivers mastery of virtual table tennis, a sport so ideally suited for VR that headset companies often use it as an example of what the technology can do when giving interviews to [...] The post Every Oculus Store Game/App With Cross-Buy Between Rift and Oculus Quest appeared first on UploadVR.

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Facebook’s two new VR headsets, the updated Oculus Rift S and the standalone Oculus Quest, are now out. That means accessories for both devices are available too. Those include replacements for the new Touch controllers. You can already buy replacement left and right controllers for $69 each. Fully replacing a pair would cost $138, then. Oculus is also selling replacement facial interfaces for both devices and even a replacement headband for Rift S. For Quest, meanwhile, you can get replacement AC adapters, in-ear headphones and a travel case (which we weren’t too keen on). The new Touch controllers work on both Rift S and Quest, but come bundled with each. Take note, though, that the controllers don’t work with the original Oculus Rift, so don’t buy these if you’re sticking with that. Not that you’d really need to if they did work; the new Touch simply puts the tracking ring on top of your hand instead of below it. Otherwise it still has the same buttons and features. That means six degrees of freedom (6DOF) positional tracking, analog sticks and more. In fact, if anything the design on the new pair isn’t quite as good as the original. It can feel off-balance and it’s also easy to push the battery cover out by accident. They’re still great controllers in their own right, though. Looking for more Oculus Quest and Rift S launch coverage? Check out our reviews of both headsets and take a look at some of the best Quest games you can pick up on launch day. Enjoy! Tagged with: oculus touch, replacements, vr controllers .special-buttons > * { text-align:left !important; } FacebookTwitterRedditMore The post New Oculus Touch Replacements Now On Sale For $69 Each appeared first on UploadVR.

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Join us today for a massive Oculus Quest launch day livestream! We're giving away DOZENS of copies of Quest games live on the stream today. The post Oculus Quest Launch Day Giveaway Livestream appeared first on UploadVR.

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This review was originally published on April 30, 2019. Last Saturday I pulled Oculus Quest over my eyes, booted up Fast Travel Games’ Apex Construct and played until the battery was flat. It lasted two hours and 50 minutes from full charge. In that time I had four instances of the device momentarily losing head tracking and two instances of the Oculus Touch controller tracking drifting or jumping unexpectedly. Other than that, I played a fully intact PC VR game on a standalone headset. The visual fidelity had taken a significant hit but was far from unsightly. The freedom to twist and turn in VR without worrying about wrapping my legs in wires was liberating and, for the vast majority of the experience, the tracking performed in-line with current PC VR standards. Quest has its fair share of caveats, then. A VR enthusiast that’s owned an HTC Vive or Oculus Rift for the past three years is unlikely to be swayed by its limited processing power and somewhat compromised tracking. But for the audience that’s sat on the sidelines since 2016, waiting for VR’s various barriers to come tumbling down, Oculus Quest is the real deal. Diligent Design   Quest is a standalone VR headset. That means that everything it needs to run is already built into the device. No PCs, no smartphones, no consoles; $399 gets you all you need to jump right into VR. As such, it’s heavier than a Rift; my scales told me Quest weighs in at 580g compared to Rift’s 470g. Having spent extensive time with both, though, I couldn’t really notice the difference. If anything, the padded lining faceplate on Quest makes it more comfortable to wear than Rift’s more rigid alternative. There are some nice additions to the design, too. The head strap, for example, expands and retracts from the hinges, giving you room to pull it on and then have it fit to your head without adjusting it every time. That said, the tough rubber strap can dig into the back of your head over time, similar to how the top of your head can hurt when wearing headphones. It took a fair bit of fiddling to find the perfect balance but, once I got there, Quest felt great on my head. Specs And Stuff On paper, Quest is about in-line with what you’d expect from a mobile VR headset in 2019. Its 1,440 × 1,600 per-eye is an appreciated step up from the original Rift but far from a revolution, with the gaps between pixels still clearly visible once you’ve acclimatized to the device. Small text is definitely easier to read but don’t expect an eye-opening jump. Audio, meanwhile, adopts the same excellent design from 2018’s Oculus Go. There’s a pair of built-in speakers that allow you to play at a volume that suits you but also hear what’s going on in the world around you. A three-hour battery life might not sound too impressive for Quest. But, in practice, I found this accommodated the headset pretty well. Many of VR’s [...] The post Oculus Quest Review: Facebook’s Standalone Savior Mostly Keeps Its Promises appeared first on UploadVR.

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This review was originally published on April 30, 2019. Facebook and Valve support VR for different reasons. Valve’s Steam storefront is the dominant digital distribution store on personal computers. Virtual reality creates new markets for content which Valve can sell to PC owners via Steam. Facebook’s relationship to people is reliant on platforms controlled by other companies like Google, Apple, and Microsoft. VR offers an opportunity for Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook to loosen its dependence on those companies. I start there in my Rift S review for a few reasons. First, Facebook set its embargo for Rift S reviews at 10:30 AM Pacific on April 30 — mid-way through its keynote at the F8 developers conference which started at 10 AM. About two hours before my hands-on time with the Valve Index HMD last week, a representative from Valve emailed me to say the company shifted its embargo time from May 1 to April 30 at 10 AM Pacific. Any sense of rivalry between these companies is not imaginary. It is fact. Second, it is apparent Facebook prioritized one consideration in its design of the follow-up to 2016’s Oculus Rift. Above all else, Rift S makes it easier for new VR buyers to sign up for an Oculus account, set up their headset, and get into a virtual world delivered by Facebook. Easier Setup And Lower Cost Before Rift S arrived at my home on Friday last week I disconnected three USB cords from my PC. Each cord ran to a sensor for tracking movement of the original Rift and its Touch controllers. At its discontinuation this month, Rift cost more than $400 for a complete “room-scale” system if you wanted all three sensors. For me, that meant running two of the three USB cords taped to my ceiling with the sensors mounted high on my walls so they could spot movement in almost any direction from the outside-in. Insight Tracking Rift S moves to “inside-out” tracking via five cameras on the headset itself to erase the need for those extra USB ports on the PC. This is the same “Insight” system deployed on Oculus Quest (via four cameras on that headset) and in my experience setting up Guardian boundaries works just as quickly and smoothly across both systems. I spent the last three years setting up Oculus Rift sensors in dozens of configurations, buying USB extension cords, drilling holes in walls and, worst of all, dealing with trial-and-error PC issues across desktops and laptops as a result of hooking up three sensors and a VR headset. I don’t think I can overstate how much of a delight the out-of-box setup experience is with Rift S in comparison to the original. You’re still limited to a tracked area tethered by a cord to your PC, although now it’s five meters instead of just four. Thankfully, now it’s no longer a huge inconvenience to simply just move the VR play area by a few feet. And, if you wanted to go portable, the inside-out tracking system is more friendly to backpack PCs. The Insight system makes it [...] The post Rift S Hardware Review: A Simplified PC VR Headset Focused On Easier Setup And Lowering Cost appeared first on UploadVR.

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We've put together a list of the very best Oculus Quest games available at launch that you can spend your hard-earned money on. The post Top 10 Best Oculus Quest Games To Buy At Launch appeared first on UploadVR.

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Tee up for your Everybody's Golf VR review which lands on PSVR soon. Does it land a hole in one or get stuck in a sand trap? The post Everybody’s Golf VR Review: Swinging For The Green appeared first on UploadVR.

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Oculus Quest is finally coming tomorrow on May 21 so we're back again with another launch lineup livestream to get your bodies ready! The post Oculus Quest Game Library Preview Livestream: Launch Day Lineup appeared first on UploadVR.

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Oculus Quest units are beginning to slip out into the wild ahead of official launch tomorrow. One of the coolest uses of the standalone VR headset we’ve seen thus far? Someone playing an entire level of Apex Construct… using only their legs. That’s right, their actual legs, not their fake virtual ones. YouTuber Jugon Virtual just posted this video of the Quest port of Fast Travel Games’ debut. In it, he tackles an entire level of the game by physically walking through it. Jugon runs around a football field covering a 6050m squared area, battling robots and dodging projectiles. It’s pretty cool to see. Jugon is able to skip backward when he’s rushed by exploding enemies and jump around cover to avoid incoming fire. At one point he’s even brave enough to roll onto his back. Quest’s inside-out positional tracking is able to handle all of this with the help of four onboard cameras. The tracking isn’t quite as extensive as, say, the original Oculus Rift, but it’s close enough. Of course, most of us won’t have an entire field to play Apex Construct in. We’ll have to make do with the teleport and artificial locomotion options the game provides. The quest port consists of the entire original game and includes recent updates too. Oculus Quest launches tomorrow and Apex Construct will be one of the first games you can buy for it. If you already own it on Oculus Rift via Oculus Home then you’ll get it for free. We thought the port of the game was first-rate. Tagged with: Apex Construct, Oculus Quest .special-buttons > * { text-align:left !important; } FacebookTwitterRedditMore The post Watch This Guy Actually Walk Through An Apex Construct Level On Quest appeared first on UploadVR.

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Today we found out that Netflix is officially coming to the Oculus Quest at launch for free (pending subscription) alongside other streaming options. The post Netflix Is Officially Coming To Oculus Quest At Launch appeared first on UploadVR.

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